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“Thank you Gangaji for the greatest gift of my life. Freedom is always here, no matter what. I take this love which has awakened and grows each day without conditions, as a continuance of the grace that can be found anywhere, at any time.“ - Prison Program participant

 

The Gangaji Foundation Prison Program is a source of inspiration for all – inside or out. Together, prisoners, volunteers and donors have made this program flourish since it began in 1994. The purpose of the program is to invite those living behind bars into self-inquiry. This rich tradition offers a key to discovering true freedom—the freedom that is alive inside of each of us no matter what our circumstances may be.

 

Books, Audios & Videos by Request
We respond to every written request we receive for Gangaji’s books, audios and videos. As of this writing, we have sent materials to almost 500 prisons. Every book is provided free of charge. We also reach out to the chaplains in prison facilities to make our books, audio and video recordings available in prison libraries.

 

Correspondence Program
The Gangaji Foundation Prison Program actually began with a prisoner’s letter to Gangaji. Today, our correspondence program matches prisoners and volunteers in letter writing, giving everyone the opportunity to connect and share their spiritual insights and deepen in the discovery of the true self.

 

In-Prison Visits
Hosting a video group in prison can be a deeply fulfilling experience. It is an opportunity to meet self-to-self, without reference to the past or the usual identifications.

 

Freedom Inside: A Course in Self-Inquiry
We are in the midst of creating a monthly course with Gangaji designed specifically for prisoners. If you would be interested in participating please let us know. We are hoping to launch the course in the fall of 2016.

 
 

What is free in this moment?

"No matter where you are, no matter what your circumstances, no matter what you have done, or not done, no matter what you think or don't think, ...[more]
 
 

Letter from a prisoner

"I have been forced to look inward, due to now I am a permanent resident in these concrete boxes." From Dave, behind bars in California.